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Troop 721 Milford, CT -  Climbing
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Top Roping Illustration In top-roping, a rope from the top of the climb always holds the climber, making most slips off the climb harmless. As shown above, the climber is attached to one end of the rope, the middle is passed through an anchor at the top of the climb, and the other end is held by the belayer. The anchor at the top of the climb is assembled from loops of webbing connected to carabiners attached securely to the rock. The rope is passed through some of the carabiners, and the others are attached to either pieces of protection, wedged into a convenient crack, or bolts, which other climbers have drilled into the rock.
The anchor's carabiners with the rope passing through are suspended below the top of the climb to prevent the rope from rubbing. When bolts or protection are far from the top of the climb, substantial lengths of webbing are needed to place the carabiners correctly. Not all climbs can be top-roped because of the following requirements:    1. There must be a safe way to the top to set the anchor before the climbers.        Most popular top-roped climbs have an easy way to hike to the top.       2. The climb may be no longer than half the length of the rope; when the climber        starts, the rope must cross the full length of the climb twice.       3. The belayer stops the rope with a belay device attached to his harness if the         climber slips. The belay device makes it easy to apply enough friction to stop         a falling climber. If there is some danger of the belayer being lifted into the air,         he can be anchored down.        4. The belayer must keep the slack in the rope to a minimum since when a         climber slips, any slack must be taken up before the rope can stop the fall. To         take up this slack, the belayer pulls the rope downward as the climber climbs.         While doing this, the belayer must never release the rope fully to ensure the         climber could never fall far.
Top-Roping and Belaying
 Climbing
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Top Belaying